Thursday, 14 September 2017

St Anne's Well

There is little known about St Anne's Well – an ancient holy well, originally called Wealletune after the place-name (Welton, East Yorkshire), adopted by Christianity and re-named St Anne's Well in c.1080. Prior to that it is believed to have been a place of pagan ritual, the well being a portal to the Otherworld. It's particularly meaningful to me as I played around the site of the well as a child. Unaware of the history beneath my feet at that time, I continue to be drawn back there in dreams.

"... the holy well stands before a long, if tiny and ill-lit, corridor of history with doors leading off into many unexpected and little-visited rooms..." James Rattue, author of The Living Stream.

The well has been covered with stone slabs for a long time, a tree has tried to grow over it.  It has been sheltered here over the years in the grounds of Welton House, a large estate which was demolished in 1952.

An archeological report made of an area near the well recovered early prehistoric, Iron Age, Roman and early medieval pottery from a  layer of ‘hillwash’ above the natural chalk; the presence of these pottery fragments testifies to early settlement in the vicinity of the site, including some which could date to the late 11th century, when the well came into being.  

Welton House 1923
I was fortunate to be granted access to the site recently and was delighted to discover the well and natural spring which is still seeping from the ground. It is awe inspiring to imagine the people gravitating to this water-source with their fears and desires over the years. For at least a thousand years, this ancient spring has served a multitude of needs. I hope to convey a sense of this timeless promise in the photographs below. 


The water is trickling into here. The well itself is about 3 metres to the right.
St Anne's Well (covered)





There are deer who have been on this plot of land for decades, they eat these leaves, a neat fringe.
Ganoderma Applanatum 
White Holly


This is an excerpt from my 40 minute immersive soundscape, incorporating CymaScope imagery by John Stuart Reid. It was first shown at Islington Arts Factory in April 2017 on the opening night of my solo exhibition How Shall I Get Elephants To Stay, accompanied by an improvised performance from Estelle Riviere as The Owl. Within the Cymascope instrument the surface of pure water offers a kind of super-sensitive membrane and by imprinting sounds onto the liquid surface, unique patterns of sound energy are created for every unique sound.

The heron is an enigmatic being richly featured in mythology and folklore. For me, herons can be the most beautiful creatures to grace our skies, and whenever I see one I instinctively feel it is a 'good omen'; somehow they chime with me.  In St Anne's Well, the heron may be both guardian or oracle, but always an enduring presence in our subconscious landscapes.


Ganoderma Applanatum

Ganoderma Applanatum, otherwise known as The Artist’s Conk. I found this one growing on a tree next to the well, I didn’t know its name at the time but thought it looked interesting, so I took it as a memento. It was fed by St Anne’s Well, Wealletune. So, apart from dreams where I roam these grounds and sleep in the water, wrapping it around me like a blanket, it is now tangible, I can hold it in my hand.


Wednesday, 23 August 2017

A Child's Rumour







written, performed & produced by © Gaynor Perry



In the sky beyond power lines, hulking ash clouds
the old tree, a colossus, leans backwards as if to catch the stars

I'm susceptible to ancient springs, melodious landscape
I'm pregnant with the child I was, still exploring branches

underground, a portal, all comfort denied
underneath a table, hard labour – Will Usher relayed the crime

I'm susceptible to mysteries, just like my sister
I'm pregnant with the child I was, still exploring rumour

rumour, a child's rumour
until our lives reveal the mess
our flesh grows around the rumour

caught up in the vast terrain of unanswered questions
jumping over the rose bush, laughing in the pouring rain.





The truth is stranger than fiction ... gyr falcon x saker - Ruby






Saturday, 29 April 2017

How Shall I Get Elephants To Stay – exhibition

A SOLO EXHIBITION BY MULTIDISCIPLINARY ARTIST GAYNOR PERRY

Islington Arts Factory, 2 Parkhurst Road, London N7 0SF

28 April to 19 May, 2017


Opening Times.
10am - 11pm Mon - Weds
10am - 10pm Thurs
10am - 7pm Fri
10am - 5.30pm Sat
11am - 5.30 pm Sun

About the exhibition

This is an exhibition of the artwork featured in Gaynor's book of dreams,  entitled as above.

Here you will see paintings, photographs and sculptures expressing the artist's subconscious reality which guides the empathic bonds she forms with the Animal Kingdom and Mother Nature.

During sleep the body and mind repairs itself in order to thrive. It is a time for restoration where essential truths are revealed in the realm of dreams, engaging with all the senses. In dreams, perception of time and space defies scientific laws. There are no rules in these surreal vistas, only an invitation to explore, untethered, and learn the true nature of our fears and desires.

Throughout history a reverence for the power and meaning of dreams has shaped civilisations.  They provide us with a potent awareness of ourselves and our bearing in the world.

Gaynor invites you to look through her subliminal lens, to lift the veil on isolation and re-establish a strong alliance with the natural world, mirrored in oneself.

There is a display copy of the book available to view as part of the exhibition. It can be ordered here, print to order. Large format £63 / Small format £31 plus P&P.  116 pages, 120 images, 38 dreams.

Opening reception

On the opening night, Friday 28 April, there was a presentation of Gaynor's audiovisual work; music composition and production, singing and songwriting, each film being directed and produced by Gaynor, featuring gifted friends and collaborators.

Still from St Anne's Well – immersive soundscape by Gaynor Perry

ST ANNE'S WELL (40 mins)
Immersive soundscape, incorporating CymaScope imagery by John Stuart Reid.

There is little known about St Anne's Well – an ancient holy well, originally called Wealletune after the place-name (Welton, East Yorkshire), adopted by Christianity and re-named St Anne's Well in c.1080. Prior to that it is believed to have been a place of pagan ritual, the well being a portal to the Otherworld. It's particularly meaningful to me as I played around the site of the well as a child. Unaware of the history beneath my feet at that time, I continue to be drawn back there in dreams.

"... the holy well stands before a long, if tiny and ill-lit, corridor of history with doors leading off into many unexpected and little-visited rooms..." James Rattue, author of 'The Living Stream'.

The heron is an enigmatic being richly featured in mythology and folklore. For me, herons can be the most beautiful creatures to grace our skies, and whenever I see one I instinctively feel it is a 'good omen'; somehow they chime with me.  In St Anne's Well, the heron may be both guardian or oracle, but always an enduring presence in our subconscious landscapes.

What is a CymaScope? “The CymaScope is a new type of analog scientific instrument that makes sound visible, allowing scientists to see sound's vibrations. Within the instrument the surface of pure water offers a kind of super-sensitive membrane and by imprinting sounds onto the liquid surface, unique patterns of sound energy are created for every unique sound. Just as the invention of the microscope and telescope revealed aspects of the world and Universe that we didn't even know existed, the CymaScope allows the once hidden realm of sound to become visible. And since everything in the Universe is in a state of vibration a tool that shows the structures within sound and vibration can provide important new scientific insights.” John Stuart Reid.

Estelle Riviere as The Owl. Concept and photography – Gaynor Perry. Venue – Islington Arts Factory
ESTELLE RIVIERE (Monsterlune). Estelle created the owl costume and performance based on my sketch and painting 'Blue Bear'. Estelle is known for her highly creative and outlandish performances, which showcase her unique talent for costume making and painting, transporting her audience into the realms of the surreal.

ST ANNE'S WELL was described beautifully by Estelle's spellbinding improvised performance.

Estelle Riviere as The Owl 
Estelle Riviere as The Owl in the CymaGlyph
Estelle Riviere as The Owl
Blue Bear – 40 x 40cm, oil on board

Audiovisual Programme – Opening Reception


featuring Deborah Griffin, Gaynor Perry,
Estelle Riviere, Maria Rosa Mojo
featuring Howie and Simone Austwick
featuring Evelyne Allard, Noko 440, Gaynor Perry
featuring Marnie Scarlet
featuring Gaynor Perry
featuring Gaynor Perry
featuring Francis Angol, Estelle Riviere, John Stuart Reid

Selected works

The exhibition comprises 40 works – photography, painting and sculpture. Below, a selection. Here is an album of the complete exhibition.

Primary Route – 80 x 80 cm, oil on board
The subconscious landscape; my route to primary school as viewed from above.
What Shapes Me – 28 x 23 x 10 cm, air-dried clay sculpture. Books.
The Sacred Blue Penguin Portal – Fabric, thread & paint 110 x 25 x 17 cm
The Sacred Blue Penguin Portal – Fabric, thread & paint 110 x 25 x 17 cm ... here's the dream
The Sacred Blue Penguin Portal – Fabric, thread & paint 110 x 25 x 17 cm 
New Forest #2 – Black & white photographic print
Hermit's Burrow – Wooden box painted blue, approximately 42 x 42 x 42 cm, covered in chicken wire, camouflaged with twigs. The opening framed with aged timber. Inside the box is a wooden bed. The mattress is filled with earth and covered in a thin, red quilt. Seated on the bed is an anthropomorphic bird woman sculpture made from air-dried clay. Standing sentinel by the box is an aged timber post mounted on a blue wooden square, 40 x 10 x 10 cm.
Hermit's Burrow (interior) – anthropomorphic bird woman sculpture made from air-dried clay


Blue Bear – 40 x 40cm, oil on board


A Charming Fellow, Patagonian Mara – Black & white photographic print

Tim-Lay-Lav – Air-dried clay sculpture . 20 x 20 cm. Mirror disc. Glass bell cloche.
Encephalic Cleansing #3 – 25 x 25 cm, gouache on watercolour paper
Portrait of Bert – Black & white photographic print. 101.6 x 76.2 cm
I Prick My Thumb: An introvert in the making – Hand-carved wooden thumb, 42 x 20 cm. Rope. An outline of the artist's body in tailor's chalk, hand-stitched in blue thread on pale silk material, with a central silver seam, 194 x 110 cm.
The Old Ruins of Helen de Helen – 61 x 61 cm, oil on board
The subconscious landscape; a place I dreamed of, perhaps denoting the 'self of the self', my first name being Helen.
Little Feet – Air-dried clay sculpture of child's feet. 10 x 6 cm, 13 x 7 cm. Mirror disc. Glass bell cloche.
Elephantine Beginnings – Black & white photographic print. 101.6 x 76.2 cm 
Installation view
Installation view
Installation view

Guest photos.


What Shapes Me. Photo – Spacy Gracy
The Sacred Blue Penguin Portal. Photo – Stephen Crampton-Hayward
Opening night audiovisual. Photo – Deborah Griffin
Opening night audiovisual. Photo – Gloria Gigi Garcia 
Estelle Riviere, opening night. Photo – Gloria Gigi Garcia 
Opening night, We Morph #2 and The Solution.  Photo – Gloria Gigi Garcia 
The Sacred Blue Penguin Portal.  Photo – Gloria Gigi Garcia
Opening night.  Photo – Gloria Gigi Garcia
We Morph #1-2.  Photo – Gloria Gigi Garcia
Little Feet. Photo – Deborah Griffin
I Prick My Thumb: An introvert in the making. Photo – Deborah Griffin 
Estelle Riviere as The Owl. Photo – Deborah Griffin

Estelle Riviere as The Owl. Photo – Zaz Arnold

The Owl – performance by Estelle Riviere for St Anne's Well

Estelle Riviere as The Owl. Performance for St Anne's Well. Photo – Lou Looby Love
Estelle Riviere as The Owl. Performance for St Anne's Well. Photo – Richard Kaby
Estelle Riviere as The Owl. Performance for St Anne's Well. Photo – Richard Kaby
Estelle Riviere as The Owl. Performance for St Anne's Well. Photo – Richard Kaby
Estelle Riviere as The Owl. Performance for St Anne's Well. Photo – Richard Kaby
Estelle Riviere as The Owl. Performance for St Anne's Well. Photo – Richard Kaby
Estelle Riviere as The Owl. Performance for St Anne's Well. Photo – Richard Kaby
Estelle Riviere as The Owl. Performance for St Anne's Well. Photo – Richard Kaby

An exhibition doesn't happen by itself – with heartfelt thanks, for seamless and solid support, to Jen Snowball, Joe White, Estelle Riviere, Eleanor Pearce and Aleks Solinski/Ace Bros.